Clean Air Protects Lung Health

earth day clean air healthy lungs

Did you know more than 137 million Americans live in communities with unhealthy levels of air pollution? Clean air is critical to protecting lung health. While air pollution is bad for anyone to breathe, it is especially dangerous for people living with asthma, COPD, and other lung conditions.

Breathing polluted air can irritate your lungs and may cause shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, asthma flare-ups, and chest pain. It also puts you at risk for lung cancer, heart attacks, stroke, and even death.

While we continue to make progress, air pollution remains a serious environmental and health problem. Additionally, as global warming accelerates, climate change will impact public health and put people living with lung disease at additional risk.

By taking small steps together, we can protect our air and our health. Watch this message from Joel Africk, RHA’s President & Chief Executive Officer.

How to Protect Lung Health and Promote Clean Air

  • Walk, bike, or use public transportation when possible.
  • Try to reduce your waste and recycle.
  • Try to avoid gasoline-powered lawn equipment like leaf blowers.
  • Raise awareness by telling people about the importance of clean air. Sharing this message on social media is a great start!
  • Advocate healthy lungs and clean air for all with us!

COVID-19 Vaccines and Lung Disease

covid-19 vaccines armAs COVID-19 vaccines become available to older adults and people living with chronic conditions like lung disease, it’s important to consider scheduling an appointment for yourself. Older adults, as well as people with COPD, are at greater risk for experiencing more severe health outcomes related to COVID-19. Getting the shot is safe for people living with lung disease and is the best way lower those risks. It also helps protect your loved ones and community.

One of the best ways to schedule your free COVID-19 shot is by calling your primary care provider. If you don’t have a primary care doctor, try calling local pharmacies, clinics, or community health centers. They may have vaccines available for you. If you prefer to make an appointment online, you can do so through Zocdoc. Keep in mind that two of the currently available vaccines require two doses.
In addition, family or informal caregivers who live in Cook County, Illinois are eligible now. Call your local Aging and Disability Resource Center to complete a three-question phone screening. After the screening, caregivers will receive a letter certifying their status as a family caregiver.
The Chicago Department of Public Health is additionally offering a new program for people who have a difficult time leaving home. The Chicago Fire Department will come to homes to provide vaccinations for eligible seniors 65+ and their caregivers. The program is available for Chicago residents who are seniors or people with a disability who:
  • Require in-home assistance or
  • Need equipment and/or accessible transportation to leave home.
If you are interested in receiving your shot at home, fill out this online form and someone will reach out to you via email with more information.

RHA hosts annual stair climb event outdoors in 2021

For Immediate Release

March 23, 2021

Erica Krutsch, Director of Marketing & Communications

734-262-4527

[email protected]

Hustle Chicago® charity stair climb to take place outdoors, with masks April 18

The event benefits Chicago lung health nonprofit Respiratory Health Association

CHICAGO, IL – Amid other signs of spring and a slow return to post-pandemic ways of life, a Chicago tradition will take a new shape in 2021. The Hustle Chicago stair climb, formerly known as Hustle Up the Hancock, will take place Sunday, April 18.

This year’s event will be held outdoors at Soldier Field and will feature several changes to ensure a healthy and safe climb. These efforts included limited capacity, mask requirements, social distancing, and sanitization procedures. There is also a virtual event option available.

“We are excited to be able to host an in-person event for the first time in over a year,” said Joel Africk, President & CEO, Respiratory Health Association. “We are confident that by working with our host venue and medical experts we have modified Hustle Chicago stair climb to provide a safe experience. The event gives people a chance to exercise and support our mission of healthy lungs and clean air.”

Respiratory Health Association hopes the event will raise $500,000 to support local lung health work including educational programs for people living with diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and funding for research into new treatment options for lung cancer and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

Participants in the climb come from all walks of life and many are personally impacted by lung disease, including Ron Fiege, a resident of Ingleside, IL.

“I thought ‘what a great way to add a different exercise into my work out and raise some money for a very good cause’ because I have asthma and my sister and a few very close friends have COPD,” says Fiege, who is climbing in his second Hustle Chicago event this year. “When I talk to my sister, and she is smiling through her very short breath, it inspires me and reminds me that I’m very blessed to be as healthy as I’m at this point in my life.”

Limited spaces are still available for the in-person climb for a $55 registration fee and $100 charitable pledge. Virtual event registration costs $35. Visit resphealth.org/hustle to learn more and register.

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A public health leader since 1906, Respiratory Health Association (RHA) is dedicated to its mission of preventing lung disease, promoting clean air and helping people live better lives through education, research and policy change. To achieve that goal, RHA collaborates with researchers in pursuit of new treatments and cures for disease like asthma, COPD and lung cancer; empowers adults and children by teaching them skills to manage their health; delivers evidence-based tobacco cessation programs; and works with lawmakers to craft innovative policies that build a more equitable and sustainable future.

Celebrating Organ Donors and the Lives They Impact

Every February, National Donor Day celebrates and recognizes those who changed the lives of others through organ donation. According to Donate Life America, 113,000 people in the U.S. are currently waiting for life-saving organ transplants. Thousands of those are living with lung cancer or other chronic lung diseases like pulmonary fibrosis.

One person’s organ donation has the potential to save as many as eight lives of those in need.

Respiratory Health Association works with a number of people who have received a second chance at life through an organ donation. Each of them has dedicated their time to giving back in the hope of helping others living with lung disease.

Steve Ferkau     

“I am only here as a result of improved research and treatments into lung disease. I am a miracle of science and the generosity of my donor Kari and her family.”

 

 

 

 

man and woman outside

Tim Thornton

“It was surreal that you could go from not being able to breathe to thinking that you have a second chance with a new set of lungs. I am forever grateful to the donor’s family who made the decision to donate the gift of life.”

Read Tim’s story

 

 

 

man walks daughter down the aisle

Tom Earll

On the third morning after his transplant, Tom could see downtown Chicago from his bed. The sun rose, reflecting off the glass buildings. “I sat up and took a deep breath. I got hit with this wave of emotion, and I burst into tears because I realized that this was my new normal.”

Read Tom’s story  

To learn more about how organ donation can make an impact or to add your name to the donor registry, visit organdonor.gov.

Protect Your Family with a Home Radon Test

Radon is an odorless, colorless gas that occurs naturally in the environment. It can enter homes through cracks in the foundation and go unnoticed for long periods of time – potentially causing long-term lung health problems for those living inside. Breathing in radon can damage cells in the lungs and even lead to lung cancer. Exposure to radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, causing nearly 21,000 deaths annually. January is Radon Action Month, a great time to test your home for unsafe levels of this gas and take steps to remove it if needed.residential street

According to the U.S. EPA, nearly one in 15 homes has elevated radon levels. Home testing is the only way to identify elevated levels of radon, but you can purchase affordable, do-it-yourself test kits from most hardware stores and online.

There are a variety of short-term testing devices that take between two and 90 days to complete. These are good if you need quick results.  Long-term devices remain in the home for more than 90 days. They may provide a more accurate radon average as levels vary from season to season.

If test results are above 4.0 pCi/L — a measure of radioactivity in a liter of air — you should take additional steps to reduce radon levels. The Illinois Emergency Management Agency has a list of professionals trained to mitigate radon in residential areas who can help you address these issues.

Experts recommend testing your home every two years.

Have additional questions about radon gas or how you can make sure your home is safe? Learn more with our library of radon-related resources.

Sharing Hope for a Future Free of Lung Disease

As we close out a year of many challenges, I am proud of all we have accomplished at Respiratory Health Association (RHA). Together, we have continued to reach for a future free of lung disease.

With the support of our dearest friends, supporters, and partners this year, we made some amazing progress.

Five things give me hope for a brighter tomorrow.

 

Our amazing Making a Difference Volunteers

They give me hope and inspiration in their dedication and support of healthy lungs and clean air for all. Whether riding CowaLUNGa to support kids who have asthma or working with people committed to quit smoking, these awardees have lived RHA’s mission and they are amazing.

collage of photos

RHA’s resilient program staff

When respiratory therapists paused their pulmonary rehabilitation programs for patients living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and shifted to help care for COVID-19 patients, RHA stepped up and provided much-needed patient resources. RHA’s new Project STRENGTH (Support for Transitioning Rehabilitation and Exercise Now Going to Home) offers exercise routines and breathing tips COPD patients can use at home.

girl behind sewing machine and face masksOne of RHA’s Next Generation Advocates, Mia Fritsch-Anderson

Mia, a high schooler who lives with asthma, made more than 3,500 masks over the last nine months. Mia donates masks to people in need and sells some with all the proceeds going to charities doing important work during the pandemic.

Our local research community

These scientists have worked tirelessly over the last year to find treatments and new vaccines for COVID-19. The collaboration across the industry has saved countless lives, and RHA is excited to help promote the vaccine in the new year.

Our environmental policy staff and partners

Amidst the pandemic, they have continued to fight for equitable clean air policies and to reduce climate change. The air we breathe has a direct effect on our lungs, and these advocates are committed to protecting the air to ensure we can all breathe better.

These people, and their tremendous work, give me hope for a brighter tomorrow.

Please join us and make a gift today to help create a tomorrow where everyone breathes easier.

Thank you for being a part of Respiratory Health Association’s community.

Have a happy new year,

Joel J. Africk
President and Chief Executive Officer

Mia Gives Hope for a Future Where Everyone Breathes Easier

girl behind sewing machine and face masks

Mia has produced over 3,500 masks to help people during the pandemic.

Throughout the years, young people have challenged society to do better and often advocate a different future – the future they wish to inherit.

This year was no exception, and Respiratory Health Association was driven by passionate young people toward a future where everyone breathes easier. One of these young advocates, Mia Fritsch-Anderson, eagerly stepped up to make a difference during the early days of the pandemic.

Mia has been working with RHA since her asthma diagnosis at age five. She has championed asthma protections for students and smoke-free policies at the local and state levels.

When COVID-19 began to spread, Mia was immediately aware of the extra warnings for people living with lung disease. Mia and her family have taken all the necessary precautions to ensure she avoids getting COVID-19, which could lead to a more severe infection because of her asthma. However, she still wanted to find a way to safely continue her work helping the community – and alleviate her feeling of helplessness from being stuck inside.

Mia used her sewing skills to make masks for essential workers and people at increased risk. By June, Mia had made 500 masks. She worked with RHA staff to identify People for Community Recovery, one of our community partner’s on Chicago’s South Side, to help distribute the masks to people in need. Together, we provided the masks and much needed bottled water to teens with asthma and their families.

As the pandemic stretches on, Mia hasn’t stopped making masks. By her last estimate, Mia had made over 3,500 masks! She continues to provide them to people in need and has opened an Etsy shop to sell extras, donating the proceeds to Respiratory Health Association and other charities doing important work during the pandemic.

Teens like Mia continue to inspire us. RHA works hard to advocate with them – creating a world where we can breathe easy. During this year, we have continued to advocate stronger support of our health care system during the pandemic, stronger protections against tobacco companies’ predatory marketing, and stronger air pollution standards.

2021 promises to be a year of change as we join our community partners in advocating support for asthma management programs and the Clean Energy Jobs Act in Illinois, which will protect the air we breathe.

You can join us in celebrating a hopeful future by making a donation this giving season.

COVID-19 Safety This Holiday Season

The holiday season is here women preparing food holiday seasonand with it, questions and concerns about celebrating safely while COVID-19 continues to spread. While the safest option this year is to celebrate with only those in your household and virtually “connect” with loved ones, the CDC has released new guidelines for those who wish to gather in person.

While we know that large gatherings increase the risk of spreading the virus, there is also a risk of spreading the virus in smaller family gatherings. It is best to keep activities limited to those in your household, your social bubble (which may include a caregiver), or others if social distancing can be observed.

Traditional holiday activities like parades, shopping, and other large events pose a high risk. Close physical contact and mixing with people outside of your social bubbles make it easier for the virus to spread. Instead, try shopping online or ask family members to order items for you so you can avoid crowded stores. Other low risk activities include watching sports games, parades, and movies from home. However you choose to celebrate, look at the COVID-19 positivity rates in your community. From this information, decide what best suits your family. And if you go out, always wear your mask!

Lung Disease and COVID-19: An Update

We invited Dr. Khalilah Gates, a pulmonologist from Northwestern Medicine, to share her experiences as a front-line provider during the COVID-19 pandemic and how the virus has affected people living with COPD. Dr. Gates discussed what we know so far about COVID-19 symptoms and testing, and the best prevention practices for people living with lung disease like COPD.

man with lung disease during COVID-19Common COVID-19 Symptoms

The most common COVID-19 symptoms people experience include cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fever, chills, body aches, headache, sore throat, new loss of smell or taste, and diarrhea. Symptoms vary by person, so it is important to monitor your health. Symptoms can occur between 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. Some people who recover from coronavirus have had longer lasting symptoms, including fatigue and cough.

COVID-19 Tests

There are two types of tests that are currently available: viral tests and antibody tests.

  • Viral tests: Collected via nasal swab (most reliable), oral swab, or saliva. Used to
    diagnose an active COVID infection.
  • Antibody tests: Collected through blood draws. A positive antibody test suggests you
    were exposed, but we do not know that having antibodies protects you from becoming
    re-infected.

Prevention Practices for People Living with COPD and Other Lung Diseases

While people living with COPD are not more at risk for getting COVID, there is an
increased likelihood of having a more severe case of the virus. Dr. Gates suggests the
following for people living with COPD:

  • Continue your home medications—now is not the time to stop taking any providerprescribed
    medications that help you manage your COPD.
  • Practice COVID-19 specific guidelines, which include:
    • Wearing a mask. It is very important to wear a mask that covers your
      mouth AND nose when out in public. If you are having trouble breathing
      in your mask, experiment with different fabrics, materials, and types of
      masks. If you continue to have difficulty breathing in a mask, you may
      need to limit the activities you do that require you to wear a mask.
    • Clean your hands often. Wash your hands with soap and water for 20
      seconds. If you do not have access to soap and water, use alcohol-based
      products.
    • Practice social distancing. Limit contact with people and stay six feet
      away from others when possible.
    • Clean and disinfect surfaces often.
  • Stay as active as possible. Take walks whenever possible and visit the RHA website for
    tips on exercise while staying home.
  • See your doctor. Hospitals have protocols in place to minimize transmission of COVID-19,
    but many doctors now have the option to use telehealth (which include video visits and
    phone calls).
  • Stay up to date with your vaccines, including the getting the influenza vaccine. Now is
    the right time to be getting your flu shot.

If you would like to learn more about the relationship between COPD and COVID-19, view one of our webinars on-demand.