RHA Statement on Governor Rauner’s Veto of Tobacco 21

On Friday, August 24, 2018, Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner vetoed Senate Bill 2332, legislation that would have substantially reduced youth smoking and saved the state hundreds of millions of dollars in future health care costs by raising the tobacco purchase age to 21 from 18.

Respiratory Health Association (RHA) is incredibly disappointed in Governor Rauner’s decision to veto this legislation after it passed the Illinois General Assembly.  The bill is also supported by a majority of Illinois residents. A recent study, conducted by Fako and Associates, showed that two out of three adults in Illinois support Tobacco 21, a figure that is even higher among current and former smokers.

A cornerstone of RHA’s work has been to reduce the toll of tobacco on our communities, particularly among our youth. At this point, 26 communities across the state have adopted local laws to raise the tobacco purchase age. These local laws cover more than 30 percent of the state’s population and will remain in full force and effect.

Tobacco 21 laws are important because 95 percent of adult smokers take up the habit before they turn 21. By raising the purchase age from 18 to 21, the law would have helped keep tobacco out of schools and away from teens.

“Too many kids are being exposed to tobacco products in their teenage years,” said Joel Africk, President and CEO, Respiratory Health Association. “If we can keep kids away from tobacco until they’re 21, they’re far less likely to become addicted and can live healthier lives.”

Tobacco 21 also would have yielded significant health and economic benefits.  The Institute of Medicine estimates that raising the tobacco purchase age to 21 could result in a 12 percent decrease in smoking rates by the time today’s teenagers become adults. RHA estimates that in Illinois alone the law would save $500 million in future healthcare costs and avoid $500 million more in lost productivity associated with smoking and tobacco related illnesses.

“Respiratory Health Association is undeterred.  We will continue to fight to protect kids across Illinois from smoking and tobacco addiction in the next legislative session. Tobacco 21 is the right thing to do,” continued Africk.

To date five states – California, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey and Oregon – and hundreds of municipalities around the US have raised the tobacco purchase age to 21.

Prior to working on Tobacco 21, RHA advocated strongly for the Smoke-free Illinois Act, which passed in 2007. That legislation was the strongest statewide smoke-free law in the country.

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Respiratory Health Association has been a local public health leader in Chicago since 1906. A policy leader, our organization remains committed to advancing innovative and meaningful tobacco control policies. We have been one of the state’s leading advocates for Tobacco 21 and Other Tobacco Product policies. For more information, visit www.resphealth.org.

Respiratory Health Association Statement Applauding Illinois’s Adoption of Tobacco 21

Respiratory Health Association Statement Applauding Illinois’s Adoption of Tobacco 21

Respiratory Health Association congratulates the Illinois General Assembly on the passage of statewide “Tobacco 21” legislation raising the age to purchase tobacco products in the state from 18 to 21. With the enactment of this legislation, Illinois becomes the sixth state in the U.S. to adopt a Tobacco 21 law.

A cornerstone of RHA’s work has been to reduce the toll of tobacco on our communities, particularly among our youth. Growing support for Tobacco 21 had previously led to twenty-five communities across the state adopting local laws to raise the tobacco purchase age. These local laws covered approximately 30 percent of the state’s population and paved the way for statewide action.

Tobacco 21 laws are important because 95 percent of adult smokers take up the habit before they turn 21. By raising the purchase age from 18 to 21, the law will help keep tobacco out of schools.

Tobacco 21 will yield significant health and economic benefits. The Institute of Medicine estimates that raising the tobacco purchase age to 21 could result in a 12 percent decrease in smoking rates by the time today’s teenagers become adults.

“We estimate statewide Tobacco 21 legislation in Illinois will save $2 billion in future healthcare costs. This doesn’t even include savings in lost productivity costs, which could be nearly as much,” said Joel Africk, president and chief executive officer of Respiratory Health Association.

Prior to working on Tobacco 21, RHA advocated strongly for the Smoke-free Illinois Act, which passed in 2007. That legislation was the strongest statewide smoke-free law in the country. By passing Tobacco 21 now, we celebrate the 10th anniversary of that innovative policy by further protecting our youth from the harmful impact of tobacco.

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Respiratory Health Association has been a local public health leader in Chicago since 1906. A policy leader, our organization remains committed to advancing innovative and meaningful tobacco control policies. We have been one of the state’s leading advocates for Tobacco 21 and Other Tobacco Product policies. For more information, visit www.resphealth.org.

Chicago Youth Cigarette Use Hits Historic Low

Respiratory Health Association joined with other patient advocacy organizations in congratulating the City of Chicago on its announcement that cigarette smoking by high school students in Chicago is at an all-time low. According to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 6 percent of Chicago high school students reported current cigarette smoking in 2017 – a 56 percent decline from 2011.

graph showing youth smoking rates in Chicago in 2011 compared to 2016

Since 2011 the Chicago youth cigarette smoking rate has declined from 13.6% to just 6%.

In Chicago, the decline in youth cigarette smoking represents nearly 7,000 fewer teen smokers and an estimated $100 million in long-term health care savings.

Chicago has been recognized as a national leader in tobacco control. Key efforts include:

 

  • The nation’s strongest smoke-free ordinance in 2006
  • A prestigious $11.5 million tobacco control grant from the CDC in 2009
  • The nation’s first flavored tobacco regulation inclusive of menthol cigarettes in 2013
  • The nation’s second e-cigarette ordinance in 2014
  • Expansive smoke-free parks ordinance in 2014
  • Establishing the nation’s highest tobacco unit price, and
  • A comprehensive youth tobacco prevention package including Tobacco 21 in 2016.

 

RHA was a local leader in the advocacy efforts leading to the adoption of these policies, including Tobacco 21, in Chicago.

“Chicago continues to lead the fight against tobacco. We’re encouraged by the data because it demonstrates that our collective efforts are successful in building a tobacco-free generation,” said Joel Africk, President and Chief Executive Officer of Respiratory Health Association and Healthy Chicago community co-leader for tobacco control. “More work remains to be done to prevent the use of other tobacco products,” he added, “including cigars, electronic cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.”

Healthy Chicago is the citywide plan to improve health equity, launched by Mayor Emanuel and Chicago Department of Public Health. Respiratory Health Association serves as Healthy Chicago’s community co-chair for tobacco control and offers evidence-based tobacco control strategies and smoking cessation programs.

Building on Chicago’s success, RHA is now advocating for statewide adoption of Tobacco 21 in Illinois.

Contact us for more information on how you can support Tobacco 21.

Decreasing youth tobacco use across Illinois

With the support of RHA and other organizations, State Sen. Julie Morrison (D-Deerfield) and State Rep. Camille Lilly (D-Oak Park) have introduced legislation to raise the minimum age for tobacco sales in Illinois from 18 to 21.

Known commonly as Tobacco 21, the effort aims to curb youth smoking, which will lead to fewer adult smokers in the future and result in substantial long-term health care savings.

“Statistics show that 95 percent of smokers start before the age of 21,” said Matt Maloney, director of health policy for Respiratory Health Association. “By raising the age of sale for tobacco to 21, Illinois will greatly reduce smoking among high school children.”

“Our goal is to create the first smoke-free generation,” said Joel Africk, President and Chief Executive Officer of Respiratory Health Association. “Tobacco 21 gives us a great chance of making that happen.”

Each year in Illinois, 5700 teens under the age of 18 become new daily smokers. If these rates persist, 230,000 Illinois teens alive today will die prematurely from smoking.

The economic impact of smoking is staggering. Each year, tobacco use costs Illinois $5.49 billion in health care costs and $5.27 billion in lost productivity, according to research from the Campaign for Tobacco-free Kids. “By reducing youth smoking, we can make a meaningful change in the adult smoking rate and reduce these staggering costs,” said Africk.

Nearly 300 cities across 16 states, plus the states of California, Hawaii, New Jersey, Maine and Oregon have enacted Tobacco 21 laws. In Illinois, Tobacco 21 has been adopted by Evanston, Chicago, Oak Park, Deerfield, Highland Park, Naperville, Maywood, Lincolnshire, Vernon Hills, Berwyn, Buffalo Grove, Elk Grove Village, Mundelein, and unincorporated Lake County, and it is being considered by dozens more communities.

Public support for Tobacco 21 gives a big boost to this year’s legislative effort.  New polling data shows that 65 percent of registered Illinois voters support Tobacco 21. With your advocacy and support we can continue to gain ground.

To join our efforts to pass statewide Tobacco 21 and create a smoke-free generation, take a few clicks to email your local lawmakers.

New RHA Quit Smoking Resources Available

Do you work with clients or patients who smoke? Are you interested in providing resources to individuals who are thinking about quitting? Respiratory Health Association has developed new print materials to assist and motivate individuals throughout their quit smoking journey. They are appropriate for distribution in a variety of health and community settings and include a self-help guide, a poster identifying the benefits of quitting smoking and other resources. To learn more, visit our Quit Smoking Resources or contact Lesli Vaughan by email at [email protected] or by phone at (312) 628-0208.

Celebrating Tobacco 21 Success

Village of Maywood is recognized for raising tobacco purchase age.

RHA has presented the Village of Maywood with a Lung Health Champion award in recognition of its trailblazing Tobacco 21 ordinance. In May, the Village Board unanimously voted to raise the minimum legal age for tobacco product sales in the village from 18 to 21. The ordinance took effect immediately.

“Someone has to step up and take a stand and we, the village of Maywood have taken one… it’s to save a generation that’s coming behind us,” said Mayor Edwina Perkins at the time of enactment. The Institute of Medicine projects that Tobacco 21 could reduce overall smoking by 12 percent by the time today’s teenagers become adults.

It’s been a busy summer for Tobacco 21 advocates. In addition to Maywood, the villages of Berwyn, Buffalo Grove, Lincolnshire and Vernon Hills have adopted ordinances, bringing the total number of municipalities in Illinois to 11. This week, Lake County became the first in Illinois to raise the minimum age to buy cigarettes, tobacco products and electronic cigarettes to 21 in unincorporated areas of the county.

Want to bring a Tobacco 21 ordinance to your community? Contact Matt Maloney, RHA’s Director of Health Policy, via email at [email protected] or by phone at (312) 628-0233.

Tobacco 21 from Cook County Public Health on Vimeo.